NCC 411 Frequently Asked Questions

  • General
  • September 3, 2019

QUESTION LIST:


1. Student in with clear danger to self or others 
(e.g., self-injury; suicidal or homicidal threats)

2. Student appears significantly distressed but unclear whether danger to self or others 
(e.g., sobbing; yelling; agitated; bizarre or unusual behavior)

3. Student in distress and appears to need emotional support but clearly no danger to self or others

4. Student has a medical crisis

5. Student needs non-urgent medical attention

6. Non-crisis behavioral issue - no immediate danger to self or others 
(e.g., disruptive; damage to property)

7.  Non-academic financial issues - transportation, food, housing - on each campus, who can students be referred to?

8. Student needs guidance balancing numerous caregiver responsibilities

9. Withdrawing from a class - When is a medical withdraw an option, and a good choice?  - Student does not know whether or not to withdraw due to living in the residence hall

10. Help applying for public benefits

11. Can't afford textbook

12. Financial Aid -What is the impact of grades and withdrawal from class? --How students can avoid owing money as a result of withdrawal from classes. --How to avoid losing financial aid.

13. Possible NCC Foundation scholarships

14. Possible scholarships for children to attend NCC Child Care

15. Resources for finding affordable health care 

16. Do online courses look differently on transcripts?

17. Can Monroe students access the Bethlehem Health Center if they would need to?

18. Students needing accommodations

19. How can I respond to demonstrators conveying offensive content?

ANSWERS

Question: Student in distress with clear danger to self or others
(e.g., self-injury; suicidal or homicidal threats)

Answer: Call Public Safety (610.861.5588 Bethlehem, 570.369.1911 Monroe, 484.390.3240 Fowler).  Public Safety will respond and dispatch will simultaneously notify 911 if necessary.  Counseling will be involved as needed.

Question: Student appears significantly distressed but unclear whether danger to self or others
(e.g., sobbing; yelling; agitated; bizarre or unusual behavior)

Answer: Call Public Safety (610.861.5588 Bethlehem, 570.369.1911 Monroe, 484.390.3240 Fowler ) - Public Safety will respond to ensure that situation is safe and determine whether to involve Counseling Services or Police.

Question: Student in distress and appears to need emotional support but clearly no danger to self or others

Answer: Refer student to Counseling Services and ideally walk student over to CC 250 (KEYS 130 in Monroe) or facilitate scheduling of appointment by phone. When in doubt about possible danger to self or others, err on the side of caution and call Public Safety (610.861.5588 Bethlehem, 570.369.1911 Monroe, 484.390.3240 Fowler ) to ensure safety.

Question: Student has a medical crisis

Answer: Call 911 and notify Public Safety (610.861.5588 Bethlehem, 570.369.1911 Monroe, 484.390.3240 Fowler) immediately thereafter.

Question: Student needs non-urgent medical attention

Answer: Call Public Safety (610.861.5588 Bethlehem, 570.369.1911 Monroe, 484.390.3240 Fowler) for initial response and then call the Health and Wellness Center (x5365) or walk the student over if the Center is open.  Monroe and Fowler students may access Health and Wellness Center if feasible.

Question: Non-crisis behavioral issue - no immediate danger to self or others
(e.g., disruptive; damage to property)

Answer: If unable to manage the situation, call Public Safety (610.861.5588 Bethlehem, 570.369.1911 Monroe, 484.390.3240 Fowler ).  As soon as possible thereafter, report incident using online form:  https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?NorthamptonCC&layout_id=5
A determination will be made regarding whether the incident is appropriate for a Conduct and/or Behavioral Assessment Team (BAT) response, and you will be contacted for additional information. Note:  The BAT is not an emergency response team - always contact Public Safety if the situation requires an immediate response.

Question: Non-academic financial issues - transportation, food, housing - on each campus, who can students be referred to?

Answer: Contact Maryann Haytmanek (x5350), Beatriz Sanabria (x4145) or Counseling (x5342 Bethlehem, x1842 Monroe).

If the student receives food stamps (SNAP) or cash assistance (TANF), contact Stephanie (Penny) Piper (x5310) or Xenia (Harley) Harley (x1878) in Monroe.

H.O.P.E.  Food Pantry - Located in Penn Hall (Bethlehem) and Kapp Hall (Monroe).

Question: Student needs guidance balancing numerous caregiver responsibilities

Answer: Contact Counseling Services (x5342 Bethlehem, X1842 Monroe) or Maryann Haytmanek (x5350).

If the student receives food stamps (SNAP) or cash assistance (TANF), contact Stephanie (Penny) Piper (x5310) or Xenia (Harley) Harley (x1878) in Monroe.

Question: Withdrawing from a class -When is a medical withdraw an option, and a good choice?  - Student does not know whether or not to withdraw due to living in the residence hall

Answer: If a faculty is trying to advise a student they are currently teaching, it is important for them to know that a medical withdraw requires a student to withdraw from all courses.

Students should speak with an advisor before withdrawing from courses to discuss the academic and financial impact.  The Course Withdrawal Form has a line for an advisor signature.  Or, the student can sign and waive the option of meeting with an advisor.  

When determining whether to withdraw a student for non-attendance, it is recommended that faculty take the same action with resident and commuter students; the main criterion should be whether the student will be able to be successful in the course.  

Students who must withdraw from NCC due to an unexpected medical emergency (serious illness or injury), or other extraordinary non-medical emergency (e.g., call to active Military Duty, death of immediate family member), may apply for tuition and fees credit.  Credit must be used within a one year period after the end of the semester for which the credit was granted.  Tuition credit will not be granted if a student received academic credit for courses in which he/she was enrolled.  This credit does not cover short-term loans, bookstore charges, academic fees, and charges for housing and meals.  

This student must withdraw, by the published deadline, from all class(es) for which any tuition credit is sought.

Medical Emergency:  Within thirty days (30) of withdrawal from all semester courses, the student must complete and submit the Application for Tuition Credit for Medical Reasons. Submit both the application and the physician's documentation to the Health and Wellness center.  Student will receive written notification of the decision.
Tuition Credit for Non-Medical Emergency:  The student must complete and submit the Application for Non-Medical Tuition Credit by June 30th for the spring semester, September 15 for the Summer semesters and January 30th for the Fall semester. 

Submit application to the Bursar's office.  Student will receive written notification of the decision.

Question: Help applying for public benefits

Answer: Contact Maryann Haytmanek (x5350), Counseling Services (x5342 Bethlehem, x1842 Monroe), or www.compass.state.pa.us.

Question: Can't afford textbook

Answer: Contact the Financial Aid office (x5510), the Bookstore (x5322 Bethlehem, x1830 Monroe) or Maryann Haytmanek (x5350).

A faculty member may contact the Dean on behalf of the student.  Deans sometimes have access to a desk copy or to an earlier edition.  However, this resource may not be useful if the book has online components.

Question: Financial Aid -What is the impact of grades and withdrawal from class? --How students can avoid owing money as a result of withdrawal from classes. --How to avoid losing financial aid.

Answer: If a student's course withdrawal results in a "W" and counts in his/her "attempted" NCC credits, it will be calculated in determining his/her academic progress.  Academic progress is determined at the close of the spring semester (even if the student only attends one semester).  The calculation uses ALL (not just current semester) attempted credits versus earned credits (do not count transfer credits).  Students must have a minimum completion rate of 67% and meet the GPA standards (1.50 after 9-25 attempted credits, 1.75 after 26-40 attempted credits, 2.00 after 41+ attempted credits).

A student may have to repay some of the financial aid funds received for that semester and may owe money to NCC if his/her financial aid must be recalculated.  A student receiving financial aid should ALWAYS consult with a financial aid adviser as well as academic advising before submitting withdrawal paperwork.  A student who does not receive financial aid should consult with the Bursar's Office to see how his/her tuition bill may change if he/she drops or withdraws from a course(s).  Academic advising staff can assist with questions about how a dropped class or withdrawal will impact a student's academic record and progress toward completing a program of study - this may vary depending on the student's transfer plans (if any) and desired timeline for completion.  

If a student had a loan for the current semester, or has student loans from prior semesters, once his/her enrollment is below half-time he/she will either enter the loan grace period or be required to make loan payments.  

In order for a student with federal student loans, parent PLUS loans and private education loans to qualify for the loan and also to not be required to begin repaying prior loans borrowed, a student must be enrolled for a minimum of 6 credits a semester.  The Financial Aid Office can help with any questions about loan repayment.  

The PHEAA (PA State Grant) has more requirements than federal or NCC requirements for a student to make satisfactory academic progress.  Students receiving a PA State Grant (through PHEAA) have additional requirements regarding the number of on-line and remedial credits they take.  Students can visit www.pheaa.org or call 1-800-692-7392 for additional information about PA State Grant requirements.  Any student receiving a PA State Grant should speak with a financial aid adviser before dropping or withdrawing from courses.

Question: Possible NCC Foundation scholarships

Answer: Contact Elyse Holben, Director of Scholarship Programs at 610-332-6278

NCC Scholarship Webpage for Students http://northampton.edu/scholarships.htm  

In addition contact Maryann Haytmanek (x5350) for information about how to apply for other scholarship possibilities.

Question: Possible scholarships for children to attend NCC Child Care

Answer: Contact Elyse Holben, Director of Scholarship Programs at 610-332-6278  

Contact Janette Zuk (x6084).  

Students taking credit classes qualify for student rates at the NCC Child Care Centers.
Children's Center website: http://northampton.edu/childrens-center.htm

Question: Resources for finding affordable health care 

Answer: Contact Maryann Haytmanek (x5350), Stephanie "Penny" Piper (x5310), Beatriz Sanabria (x4145), or Counseling Services (x5342 Bethlehem, x1842 Monroe - James Colon).

Question: Do online courses look differently on transcripts?

Answer: No. Transcripts do not show that a course was taken online.

Question: Can Monroe students access the Bethlehem Health Center if they would need to?

Answer: Yes.

Question: Students needing accommodations

Answer: Contact Disability Services (x5342 Bethlehem, 1910 Monroe) to get basic guidance on the process and expectations.

Question: How can I respond to demonstrators conveying offensive content?

Answer: Individuals have a First Amendment right to peaceably assemble in designated areas on campus and express their views (with some exceptions - see below), even though their views may offend others.  This may be hard to accept when the language is particularly offensive, so what can you do about it?  

Your rights include: ·        

Feeling offended and even angry (we all have the right to our feelings).

Sharing your thoughts and feelings and seeking support from trusted others.

Making your voice heard through peaceful protest.

Educating others who use hate speech - here is a helpful guide for how to respond to bigotry in daily life through legal and protected means.

Ignoring the person(s) expressing the offensive views, to help limit the audience.

Entering or exiting buildings without being blocked.  

Your rights do not include: 

Making threats of violence toward others.

Acting violently toward others.

Crossing barriers set up by campus Public Safety or police, or otherwise disobeying them.

Drowning out the demonstrators' speech with music or other created noise.  

What is hate speech?  

Hate speech is when a group of people is attacked based on factors such as gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, or disability. According to the Centers for Educational Justice & Community Engagement at UC Berkeley, hate speech includes written and verbal communication.  

When does hate speech become a crime?  

While typically hate speech has to be acted on to turn into a crime, there are exceptions.  Speech that directly threatens or harasses individual people or incites others to carry out violent acts is not protected by the First Amendment.  There is also a "fighting words" exception, which applies to intimidating speech directed at a specific individual in a face-to-face confrontation that is likely to provoke a violent reaction.  But courts have interpreted this inconsistently in the past several years.  

Although we cannot support violating others' Constitutional rights, we care very much about how our students, faculty and staff are affected by offensive speech.  If you need to talk to someone, feel free to contact Counseling Services at (610) 861-5342.

View and Download NCC 411 PDF Version

View and Download Free Speech Information PDF Version

View NCC Student Behavior and Safety PDF


Submitted by: Frequesntly Asked Questions